The new dating technology meet in a bar

04-Dec-2016 13:59 by 8 Comments

The new dating technology meet in a bar - Slave chatrooms

A couple of months ago, I was sitting at a bar minding my own business when the woman next to me did something strange.Surrounded by potential partners, she pulled out her phone, hid it coyly beneath the counter, and opened the online dating app Tinder.

So why would an app that targets itself toward non-normative relationships choose the workplace as its next frontier?

Grouper was an online, invite-only social club that uses data gathered from Facebook profiles to organize group outings (called Groupers).

Matches for the outings were gathered and analyzed first by a computer and then by a human to ensure strong matches.

The first thing I thought when I read about this was: This is a technology that Laura Linney’s character from —a nervous turtlenecked mouse who loves her hot co-worker Karl silently and obsessively from afar—would use if the movie was set in the modern day.

“@karl,” she would type into Slack, chewing her nails as she looked at Rodrigo Santoro’s bespectacled avatar and hoped beyond hope that the desperate act would deliver her from her unrequited longing. Feeld had an earlier, harder-to-pronounce incarnation as “3nder,” an app that helped people find threesomes.

Instead of interacting with the people around her, she chose to search for a companion elsewhere online.

I wondered to myself, is this what online dating has done to us?

Swiss startup Blinq has come up with a new twist on the dating app.

The startup is incorporating beacon proximity technology into the mix so singles can do more meeting IRL and less swiping — thanks to select venues being kitted out with Blinq’s Estimote i Beacons.

But the fear that online dating is changing us, collectively, that it's creating unhealthy habits and preferences that aren't in our best interests, is being driven more by paranoia than it is by actual facts.

"There are a lot of theories out there about how online dating is bad for us," Michael Rosenfeld, a sociologist at Stanford who has been conducting a long-running study of online dating, told me the other day.

There are obvious synergies between dating apps and nightlife venues.